Did you know in Southampton's history....

As a part of our 375th Southampton celebration please take a moment to enjoy
our weekly historical facts you may not have known about Southampton.
MainSt Methodist post card
Methodist Church
The first church building was constructed in 1852.  Next to the Church and connected to its east side is the Community House; this building was initially a school house in the 1840s and was moved across Montauk Highway in the 1890s where it was used as an ice cream parlor, a clothing store, a dry goods store, and a photo store.  It was sold to the Church in the 1920s by Ida Squires Downs.  The photo above was taken following the addition of this building to the Church.  The parsonage immediately to the west of the Church was constructed in the early 1900s.  Behind the Church is an old cemetery, now owned by the Town of Southampton.  (The O. T. Culver House, now used as the Church’s thrift shop, was also built in the early 1900s.)   This 1909 poster is memorabilia from the building commonly referred to as "the old St. Rosalie's church", on the corner of Montauk Highway and Walnut. It was originally constructed in 1897 by the Atlantic Council of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics, and was originally known as Atlantic Hall/Mechanics Hall.  It is shown on both the 1902 and 1916 historic maps, but is not depicted on the 1873 map.  A school house, now part of the Methodist Church, formerly occupied this location until the 1890s.   
The Foster-Downs Home
This 1911 photo is of The Foster-Downs Home, now a Town of Southampton Landmark. It was constructed in 1857 for Capt. and Mrs. Josiah Foster and is located just to the east of the United Methodist Church buildings. Capt. James E. Downs and his wife, Ida Squires, purchased the home in 1887; the home remains in Downs family ownership.  The boy standing on the running board is Edward W. Downs (1906-2000).   
Foster Downs - 1911
Atlantic Hall poster
Atlantic Hall/Mechanics Hall
This 1909 poster is memorabilia from the building commonly referred to as "the old St. Rosalie's church", on the corner of Montauk Highway and Walnut. It was originally constructed in 1897 by the Atlantic Council of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics, and was originally known as Atlantic Hall/Mechanics Hall.  It is shown on both the 1902 and 1916 historic maps, but is not depicted on the 1873 map.  A school house, now part of the Methodist Church, formerly occupied this location until the 1890s.